Does Having High Blood Pressure Mean I Can’t Get Life Insurance?

Does Having High Blood Pressure Mean I Can’t Get Life Insurance?

Life insurance will raise premiums due to high blood pressure being an early indicator of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease and chronic heart failure.

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Decline in Diabetes-Related Complications

Decline in Diabetes-Related Complications

“These findings show that we have come a long way in preventing complications and improving quality of life for people with diabetes,” said Edward Gregg, Ph.D., a senior epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation and lead author of the study. “While the declines in complications are good news, they are still high and will stay with us unless we can make substantial progress in preventing type 2 diabetes.”

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How Does High Blood Pressure Affect Life Insurance Premiums?

How Does High Blood Pressure Affect Life Insurance Premiums?

High blood pressure is called the silent killer for a reason. One in three adults in the U.S. has it, many with no symptoms, no red flags, and unless they’ve seen a doctor lately, no idea their numbers are so high they are at risk for heart attack or stroke, according to Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.

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Contributing Factors That May Cause Strokes

Contributing Factors That May Cause Strokes

Approximately 800,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year and one American dies from a stroke every 4 minutes on average according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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How Does Secondhand Smoke Exposure Affect My Insurance?

How Does Secondhand Smoke Exposure Affect My Insurance?

As a culture, Americans have been taught that there is one way to avoid the detrimental health effects of cigarette smoking: don’t smoke. However, a new study has found that more children are being exposed to tobacco smoke even if they aren’t lighting up themselves.

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Heart Disease Treatment Costs to Triple by 2030

Heart Disease Treatment Costs to Triple by 2030

By 2030, the amount of money spent in the U.S. on heart disease will be three times larger than it is today, according to the American Heart Association.

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Chronic Disease More Likely for Inactive Adults

Chronic Disease More Likely for Inactive Adults

Nearly half (47 percent) of adults with disabilities who are able to do aerobic physical activity do not get any. An additional 22 percent are not active enough. Yet only about 44 percent of adults with disabilities who saw a doctor in the past year got a recommendation for physical activity.

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Lower Life Insurance Rates By Lowering Heart Disease Risk

Lower Life Insurance Rates By Lowering Heart Disease Risk

By following the AHA’s 7 guidelines for a healthy lifestyle, individuals could reduce their risk of developing heart disease while also decreasing their life insurance premiums.

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Campaign Addresses Success in Blood Pressure Control

Campaign Addresses Success in Blood Pressure Control

Now in its third year, the Million Hearts® Hypertension Control Challenge is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

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Diabetes rates increase in American adults

Diabetes rates increase in American adults

Individuals living with diabetes can secure an affordable life insurance policy, if they can manage their blood sugar, eat a proper diet and exercise regularly.

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